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Women Mentioned by Plato

 

  • Goddesses
    • Adrastia (Nemesis)
    • Aegina (Nymph)
    • Aphrodite
    • Artemis
    • Ate
    • Athena
    • Craft, Mother of Resource
    • Dione
    • Earth
    • Harmonia, the Theban lady
    • Hera
    • Hestia
    • Iris
    • Isis
    • Memory, mother of the Muses
    • Moon goddess
    • Muses
    • Necessity, mother of Fates
    • Persephone
    • Polyhtmnia, muse of many songs, mother of earthly love.
    • Rhea
    • Selene
    • Scylla
    • Sirens
    • Styx
    • Terpsichore, Muse of Dance
    • Tethys
    • Thetis
    • Urania
  • Mythical Mortals
    • Alcestis
    • Andromache
    • Atalanta
    • Clito, daughter of Evenor, mother of Atlantis, “Poseidon desired this Damsel”, Critias, 113d
    • Hecamede – Nestor’s Concubine.
    • Hecuba
    • Helen
    • Hippodamia, daughter of Oenomaus, won by Pelops
    • Leucippe -wife of Evenor, mother of Clito
    • Medea of Colchis
    • Melanippe, daughter of Hippe, character in a lost play by Euripides
    • Niobe
    • Oreithya — “Boreas seized Oreithya from the river…Certainly the water looks charmingly pure and clear; it’s just the place for girls tobe playing beside the stream…the maiden, while at play with Pharmacia, was blown by a gust of Boreas down from the rocks hard by, and having thus met her death was said to have been seized by Boreas.” Plato, Phaedrus, 229b
    • Penelope
    • Pyrrha, wife of Deucalion
  • Historical Mortals
    • Aspasia
    • Cleopatra, mother of Perdiccas II
    • Diotima, the Manitean woman
    • Doris, Mother of Dionysus II
    • Phaenarete–midwife mother of Socrates
    • Sappho –“…I have heard something better (on Love) from the fair Sappho…” Plato, Phaedrus, 235c
    • Sophrosyne, wife of Dionysus II, nursed Plato in illness.
    • Xantippe, wife of Socrates
  • Others
    • PHAEA (Phaia), the name of the sow of Crommyon, which ravaged the neighbourhood, and was slain by Theseus. (Plut. Thes. 9; Plat. Lach. p. 196, e.; Eurip. Suppl. 316.)
    • harp girls — “Conversation about poetry reminds me too much of the wine parties of second-rate and commonplace people. Such men, being too uneducated to entertain themselves as they drink by using their own voices and conversational resources, put up the price of female musicians, paying well for the hire of an an extraneous voice–that of the pipe– and find their entertainment in its warblings. But where the drinkers are men of worth and culture, you will find no girls piping or dancing or harping. The are quite capable of enjoying their own company withour such frivolous nonsense, using their own voices in sober discussion and each taking his turn to speak or listen–even if the drinking is really heavy.” Plato Protagoras 347c.
    • madness — ”That would be right if it were an invariable truth that madness is and evil, but in reality, the greatest blessings come by way of madness, indeed of madness that is heaven sent. It was when they were mad that the prophetess at Delphi and the priestesses at Dodona achieved so much for which both states and individuals in Greece are thankful; when sane they did little or nothing. As for the Sibyl and others who by the power of inspired prophesy have so often foretold the future to so many, and guided them aright…” Plato Phaedrus 244a
    • sytem of women –“The system followed by the Thracians and many other peoples, that the women till the fields, look after the flocks and herds, and perform menial offices, exactly like slaves? Or the practice universal in our own part of the world? You know what our own customs in the matter are. We ‘pack’ all our belongings, as the phrase goes, ‘into one’ house, and and make over to our women the control of the store closet and the superintendence of the spinning and woolwork at large. Or should we perhaps vote the via media, which you take… in Laconia? Your women are expected in their girlhood to take their share in physical training and music. When they have grown up, they have no woolwork to occupy them, but you expect them to contrive a composite sort of life, one that calls for training and is far from being unworthy of frivolous, and to go halfway with the work of medicine chest, store chamber, and nursery, but to take no share in the business of war. The consequence is that if circumstances should ever force them to fight for their city and their children, they would prove quite unequal to playing and expert’s part with the bow, like Amazon’s, or any other missle weapon. They could not, could they, even copy your goddess by taking up spear and shield with the mien of doughty protectors of a harried motherland, and so strike an invader with alarm, if with nothing more, by their appearance in martial formation? As for the Sarmation women, yours, while they lead the life they do, would never venture on imitating them at all, by comparison with women like yours, theirs would pass for men.”